Meet Avie the Corgi

After the heartbreaking loss of Argos the Greyhound, we decided to adopt another dog. It seemed kind of quick, but we had a huge hole in our hearts and this little dog needed a home.

Meet Avie

Avie in charge -


I introduced her in the last post, mentioning that we found this sweet dog on She is 3 years old, spayed, and up-to-date on all of her vaccinations. She needed a nail trim, but that was it. Her main ‘issue’ is that, typical for the breed, she can be a bit bossy.

Since Purl is not a leader dog, this arrangement works out fine. Purl loves the canine companionship, Avie loves being in charge.

She is fearless. And so, so funny! Everything is an adventure. She can’t wait to get there, wherever ‘there’ is. She is always moving.

Except if she thinks Purl is on to something. Then she stuffs herself in the middle of whatever Purl is up to.

Purl and Avie -

sniff, sniff, sniff!

Buddies - Purl and Avie -

Happy traveling companions

Purl isn’t a complete pushover. She is very easy to get along with until asked to share her spot on the couch. She let Avie know that is her spot. And Avie respected that, so it has been a great match.

The cats on the other hand, have had a bit of a power struggle with a dog that is shorter than they are. And a dog who doesn’t whimper and run the other direction like the Greyhounds. Barnie and Quincy have devised a new Invsi-cat shield to handle Avie.

To be continued…

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After A Loss: How To Move Forward

As I wrote about yesterday, the sudden loss of Argos had all of us reeling. The happiness of the graduation celebration was a stark contrast to losing our beloved Greyhound.

I was worried about Purl. She is not a leader dog. She depended on having other dogs around, especially her buddy Argos. Added to this, the commotion of a busy house and company was overwhelming for her.

We gave her a room of her own to chill in, complete with her favorite treat; a peanut butter stuffed Kong. That helped in the immediate post-loss period. But…

What’s Next?

Purl watching the world go by -

Purl, watching the world go by

The cats, who loved to steal Argos’ bed and bug him using the invisi-cat shield, were also left to wonder… what’s next?

Kitties, watching the world go by -

Purl was depressed at first, as you might expect. Then she seemed to rebound. We needed some time and space for everything to calm down. Maybe Purl would relish the ‘only dog’ status in time.

We heaped on extra love and treats. She seemed to rebound well. We went back and forth to the coast a few times, and she was typical Purl — loving the hikes and car rides.

Then, about 3 or 4 weeks later, she slowed down. She lost some of that zest. Enough that I kept checking her to make sure she was OK and not sick.

It was as if she kept thinking as soon as we reached ‘there’ that Argos would show up. But… he didn’t of course. She was still eating and healthy, but definitely glum.

What About… Adopting Another Dog?

We wondered about adding a new dog to the family. Both to fill the void of Argos and be a friend for Purl. We visited the shelter. We thought about it, but were still unsure.

Then my son found a dog on who was in search of a new home. She was a 3-year old Corgi. She came with a warning about being a ‘resource guarder’ (possessive of food and toys), but otherwise good with dogs, cats, and a people-lover. Caution advised with small children.

I was proceeding with caution. Her photo was adorable. I figured she would certainly be adopted by now, but I sent an email to inquire. Several emails, a phone call, and a few texts later, we decided to meet in a couple weeks. The date was set. We both wanted to make sure she was a good fit.

First Meeting

Meet Avie -

Hello, Avie!

We drove to a mutual meeting spot (approximately mid-way for both of us) to meet. We brought Purl along for the meeting. Purl wasn’t sure what to make of such a short, energetic dog.

Avie was living in of a house of large dogs, trying to be the boss of everyone. She had been well cared for but was stressed and not happy. We talked for quite a long time and agreed to give this adoption a try. If it didn’t work out, we could get back in contact.

There’s lots more to this story, but suffice to say it was love at first sight. We took some time to get to know each other and learn the house rules, especially who the true Boss of the House is, Quincy.

Fast Forward to Now And…

Avie -

She loves long walks, food(!), and couch-lounging. She is a great dog. She makes us laugh several times a day and helps heal the holes left by all of the one-of-a-kind dogs before her. ❤



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Goodbye Sweet Argos

Argos the Greyhound was a big Greyhound (just over 80 pounds) and he has been a big part of this blog and of course, our life, too.

It was with shocked and heavy hearts that we had to say goodbye to him in June. It has taken me a while to write about our loss.

Dog Walk -

Purl, me, and Argos

The Shock

June was an extra happy time this year – celebrating our son’s high school graduation. Our small community celebrated with parties and family gatherings for weeks. We arrived home from one such celebration at 10:30pm, with Purl and Argos running towards the door to greet us, as usual.

Then a horrible scream and Argos collapsed. He was in excruciating pain after trotting to the door (on carpet) as he has done a million times before.

I knew immediately this was grim. We raced to the emergency clinic for radiographs. Horrible. Heartbreaking.

His humerus (upper part of the front leg) was smashed. This could only mean one thing: bone cancer. Also known as osteosarcoma. Something unfortunately all too common in Greyhounds.

The Goodbye

Argos had lots of painkillers administered to him when we got there, so he was pretty sleepy and calm after the shock of the event. We had to make the difficult decision at that point.

Yes, you can amputate the leg and hope for a few more months, some dogs do pretty well. However, given the amount of destruction (bone and muscle/soft tissue) and the pain, we felt it was the kindest goodbye for him. We said goodbye with the heaviest hearts.

Looking Back

Argos was just shy of his 12th birthday. We adopted him off the track when he was 4. He had been a ‘successful’ racer with lots of races and a few injuries, too. He was in pretty rough shape when we adopted him (underweight, parasites, poor hair coat), but he settled out nicely and was a joy to have in our family.

As he got older, he had a few signs of arthritis/old injury that responded well to glucosamine treatment. His attitude, appetite, and everything else were fine leading up to this. I did a full bloodwork panel (prior to his dental cleaning) the month before, and everything was normal.

Hindsight… 3 months prior to this, he limped on that leg (this was also the leg that had the injury many years prior), but it resolved after about a week. Was it a microfracture that healed as the cancer grew? I don’t know.

Remembering Sweet Argos

As a retired racer, we weren’t sure how he would be around cats. He was untested. But he was a gentle giant. He never bothered our cats, despite being the target of so many hits from the invisi-cat shield.

He put up with cats stealing his bed all of the time, too.

Cats Stealing Dog Beds -

When we first adopted him, he didn’t get what walks were all about. He walked obediently along, but rarely sniffed anything and did not seem to enjoy walk time like most dogs.

But that soon changed. If he even thought I was going for the leash, he would jump up and down excitedly. He didn’t care what the weather was like. A walk! Yes, please! Yes!

Argos on a beach walk

But even on a walk, his most favorite-of-all activity was napping.

Argos on a beach walk

Even though we have dog beds everywhere, including one of his very own, there was something special about hogging the couch all to himself.

Argos on a beach walk

We miss you, sweet boy. Run free. ❤
Sweet Argos -

Rainbow -

Continuing on…

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